This is an exceptional article. Here is the portion that spoke the loudest to me.

At my loudest, I was heard the least.

At my loudest, I felt the most pain.

At my loudest, I caused the most hurt.

At my loudest, my voice was most voiceless.

In those agonizing moments after my tearful, over-the-top meltdown, I’d frantically rummage through the junk drawer looking for my car keys. I needed to get away—far, far away.

One night I made it all the way out to the car. I was in my pajamas and my skin felt cold against the leather seats. I was shivering as my barefoot stepped on the gas pedal.

But I could not leave.

I went back inside to get my children. I gathered them up, one in each arm. I remember how they cried in confusion and fear. I made it to the door and realized I could not leave without my husband either. And I could not leave without my beloved calico cat, Callie. I could not leave my people.

Something needed to change.

I needed to find my voice—my truest voice—the one that could be heard … felt … and understood.

Source: Making Your Loudest Voice Calmer & Your Truest Voice Stronger by Rachel Stafford, the Hands Free Mama.

The author speaks of writing in journals, which is something I do myself. It really is incredibly helpful! If writing is not for you, and you’re curious about other ways to help you stop yelling, then check out The Orange Rhino – it’s another great resource.